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Habitats for Carnaby’s Black-cockatoo are being restored through work with private landowners

© Don Hadden

BirdLife Australia’s work to conserve Carnaby’s Black-cockatoo involves community engagement and education along with supporting private landholders to preserve and restore habitat. Since 2004 a volunteer team has repaired over 150 damaged or degraded nesting trees, a simple and inexpensive way to increase the chances of breeding.


Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus latirostris has a large distribution covering many different vegetation types in south-west Australia. With support from the Australian Government, BirdLife Australia has been working with local communities, landholders and land managers to secure the protection and conservation of the species and its habitat. This has involved community engagement programs and education, along with provision of support to private landholders to preserve and restore priority remnant vegetation types.

Baseline data-collection and nest-monitoring are being implemented. Since 2004, a volunteer team has repaired over 150 damaged or degraded nesting trees, a simple and inexpensive way to increase the chances of breeding.



Related Species

Compiled 2013

Recommended Citation:
BirdLife International (2013) Habitats for Carnaby’s Black-cockatoo are being restored through work with private landowners. Presented as part of the BirdLife State of the world's birds website. Available from: http://birdlife.org/datazone/sowb/casestudy/560. Checked: 17/04/2014


Key message: Managing specific populations and addressing threats
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